HERE IS A BREAKDOWN OF MY CURRENT SET-UP

 

Front Suspension

 

    Motorcarsltd Coil Conversion Kit

    OME 764 drivers side springs

    Bilstein B46-2214 shocks with shock relocation bracket

    Great Basin Rovers double cardon front driveshaft

    Detroit Truetrac Differential

    JKS 3100 sway bar disconnect links

    BFG 255/85/16 MT's

    Front from ground to top of wheel well:    38"

 

Rear Suspension

 

    OME 763 drivers side springs with 10mm OME trim packer

    Bilstein B46-2214 shocks (same as front shocks, longer and bolt right in)

    Brake line bracket

    Detroit Truetrac Differential

    Rear from ground to top of wheel well:    39"

 

Equipment

 

Rockrover Winch Bumper with Brushguard

Warn 9.5 ti winch

Rockrover Sliders

Rockrover Rear Bumper with Swing

Hella 4000 cornering beams on brushguard

Safety Devices roof rack (no longer being made)

Hella FF300 lights on roof rack

Rockrover Front differential guard

Southdown Rear differential guard

 

COIL SPRING LIFT CHART

 

Due to many question I have received over the years and customer input, I have put together a chart to show the approximate lift results with different springs.  The lift results are approximate and just a guide.

OME springs come handed, drivers side springs will be taller and passenger side springs will be shorter.  Order them from a vendor such as Expeditionexchange.com that sells them in matched pairs.  You can then specify which type you want for the front and back to slightly adjust the resulting height to your liking.

Example, if you want more lift in front and less in back, use Drivers Side in Front and Passenger Side in the rear.  As a rule of thumb, I like to have about 0.5”-1” higher in the rear as when loaded it will level out and a heavier spring rate in the rear if you are going to heavily load the vehicle.

For more information on OME springs and spring rates, please check out Expeditionexchange.com, https://www.expeditionexchange.com/ome/indexspringsmain.shtml

Use Land Rover coil spring isolators or OME trim packers to adjust height.

Also note that if you go with taller springs you will have to get longer shocks, you can use a shock relocation bracket in front as shown and front shocks in back as they bolt right in and are longer than the rear shocks.  Longer swaybar links are also necessary if you go much taller than stock.  As with any lift, your car will not drive like stock and it will want to wander more at highway speeds, make sure all your front end components are up to snuff.  A Truetrac front differential will mask the front end wander.  You may also get front driveshaft vibrations due to a lift, anything over 3” and you will probably get vibes.  A front double cardon driveshaft maybe needed.  A rear bracket to relocate the rear brakelines lower will also need to be made if you go with longer rear shocks and anything over 3”, very straightforward and easy to do. 

These numbers are approximate only.

P38 Range Rover with Motorcarsltd EAS conversion kit.  This kit uses an aluminum coil spring seat that provides about 3/4” more height than other kits that use Land Rover coil spring seats.

Table 1 - P38 Approximate Lift with Motorcarsltd Coil Conversion Kit

 

Vehicle Outfit

 

Spring Type

Front Lift

Rear Lift

Notes

 

Stock Factory Bumpers and/or Brushguard

 

 

OME 761

OME 751

OME 764

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

2.75”

4.5”

 

 

 

3.5”

3.75”

3.75”

 

 

Use Land Rover coil spring isolators or OME trim packers to adjust height.

 

 

 

 

Front Winch Bumper and Stock Rear Bumper

 

 

OME 761

OME 751

OME 764

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

OME 763

1.25”

3.5”

 

 

 

3.5”

3.75”

3.75”

4.75”

With the 761 in front and a heavy duty coil conversion kit using the stock rear springs that come with the kit, this will be great for those wanting about a stock height.

Use Land Rover coil spring isolators or OME trim packers to adjust height.

 

 

Front Winch Bumper and Rear Bumper with Swing

 

OME 751

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

OME 763

3.5”

 

 

 

 

 

3.25”

3.25”

4.25”

 

Use Land Rover coil spring isolators or OME trim packers to adjust height.

 

 

Table 2 -  P38 Approximate Lift with Conversion Kits that use Factory Land Rover Coil Spring Seats

Vehicle Outfit

 

Spring Type

Front Lift

Rear Lift

Notes

 

Stock Factory Bumpers and/or Brushguard

 

 

OME 761

OME 751

OME 764

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

2.25”

3.75”

 

 

 

2.75”

 

Only use Land Rover coil spring isolators to adjust height

 

 

 

 

Front Winch Bumper and Stock Rear Bumper

 

 

OME 761

OME 751

OME 764

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

OME 763

0.5”

1.25”

2.75”

 

 

 

2.75”

With the 761 in front and a heavy duty coil conversion kit using the stock rear springs that come with the kit, this will be great for those wanting about a stock height.

Only use Land Rover coil spring isolators to adjust height

 

Front Winch Bumper and Rear Bumper with Swing

 

OME 751

OME 764

OME 781

OME 762

OME 763

1.25”

2.75”

 

 

 

 

 

2.5”

2.5”

3.5”

 

Only use Land Rover coil spring isolators to adjust height.

 

P38 Range Rover with EAS conversion kits that use Land Rover factory coil spring seats (Atlantic British, Roverconnection, etc.).  Basically about 3/4” less height than the Motorcarsltd EAS conversion.

Only use Land Rover coil spring isolators to adjust height.

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

 

The second generation Range Rover 1995-2002 P38 came with an electronic air suspension (EAS) system and solid axles.  The EAS system works wonderfully when functioning correctly, but can be a liability when problems occur, especially if on the trail.  I wanted to completely eliminate the EAS system and at the same time lift the P38 so that it would perform better off-road.  The first step is to install an EAS to spring conversion kit and a few companies offer them for the P38, Atlantic British, Motorcarsltd, and British Pacific.  These kits basically provide you with new upper and lower coil spring seats where the air springs once were mounted.   Another option is to purchase just the coil conversion kit without the coil springs and add your own springs.  Roverconnection.com has a kit without coils springs for a very reasonable price, here is a link to the roverconnections' coil conversion kit without coil springs, http://www.roverconnection.com/RR4%20Parts/rca2c4046a.htm

 

I am not going into detail about the installation of the EAS conversion kit, but it is a very easy and straight forward installation.  Here is a link for the Atlantic British installation instructions.

 

The installation of the Motorcarsltd kit is very similar, the only difference is the Motorcarsltd kit utilizes a one piece spring seat, while the Atlantic British kit utilizes stock Land Rover spring seats along with a spring perch adapter.   My 96 RR has the Motorcarsltd kit, but the Atlantic British kit should probably yield similar lift results.  I am also currently running Bilstein B46-2214 shocks in the front and B46-2215 in the rear (updated to front Bilsteins in the rear for longer length, see update below).

 

LIFT

 

What I did was basically replace the coil springs that came with the conversion kit with Old Man Emu (OME) springs, added a front shock relocation bracket, and installed longer sway bar quick disconnect links.  I had no idea how much lift I would get from installing OME springs so it was a shot in the dark.  I chose OME 761 Passenger Side (PS) medium duty springs for the front and OME 781 (PS) md/hd springs for the rear.  I was very pleased with the 781’s in the back of my 92 RRC so I decided to try these again on the P38.  I have 751’s in the front of the RRC that has an ARB and winch so I figured 761’s might be a good choice for the P38 as it only has the stock bumper.  I highly recommend getting the OME springs from Expedition Exchange as they sell them in matched pairs.  Again I am not going into detail about installing springs as it is already well documented, pretty much the same as any spring install but here are a few pointers:

 

Front Springs:  Remove bottom shock bolt and sway bar links so that you can drop the axle as low as possible.  Watch your brake lines.  You can then install the OME springs in without a spring compressor.  Remove or trim the front mudflaps if you have them as they will interfere under certain conditions if you fit larger tires.

 

Rear Springs:  Remove bottom shock bolt, no rear sway bar so no links, unbolt the frame mounted brake line bracket to so that you can drop the axle further.  Drop the axle and watch your brake lines.  You can then install the OME springs in without a spring compressor.

 

Upon initial OME spring install, the rear sat about 1.5” taller than the front.  To alleviate this problem I added 15 mm of trim packers to the front of each spring, 10 mm of trim packers to the bottom of the front spring seat and a 5 mm trim packer to the upper front spring seat, this brought the front end up about 0.60”.   Please note that the Motorcarsltd kit’s spring seats are very deep thus allowing me to install the trim packers without any fear of the spring possibly popping out, the Atlantic British kit’s lower spring seats are the stock Land Rover seats and I would not recommend putting trim packers below the springs on these.  You could possibly install trim packers on the upper spring seat with the Atlantic British Kit, but I am not sure.  The P38 now sits about 7/8” higher in the rear when unloaded and almost perfectly level when fully loaded with gas, tools, gear, equipment, etc. 

 

Shock Relocation Bracket:  I would strongly advise doing this or installing longer shocks as you would lose about 3” of downtravel if you don’t.  This would in my opinion limit front axle articulation.  I had Onlinemetals.com cut me two pieces of 3/16” thick 3” square tube to 2” lengths.  I then had to air chisel out the old bushing mounts located on top of bottom shock bracket so that the relocation brackets could sit firmly.  The bushing mounts are only spot welded so they were fairly easy to remove, you could also possibly saw them off too.  I then bolted the relocation bracket to the original shock mount location and then bolted the shock to the relocation bracket.  I got back the 3” of lost downtravel.  An option is the have the relocation brackets made out of Ό” thick steel or weld a plate to one of the open ends for increased strength.  I have not experienced any problems with the 3/16” thick brackets as they are.  I had a very slight rubbing of the relocation bracket to the outer lip of the inside of the wheel under full steering turn, so I adjusted the steering stops out a little bit, no more rubbing.  You could easily grind an edge of the relocation bracket if you have this clearance problem.  The rear shocks were mounted in the stock location.  The rear axle has a much longer range of motion so I was not too worried about rear articulation, plus I don’t see how I would devise something to relocate the rear shock.

 

Sway Bar Quick Disconnects:  I used JKS quicker disconnects designed for a Jeep Grand Cherokee 99-present WJ, model #3100.

 

The stock front sway bar links will be too short once the OME springs are installed and will again limit downtravel.  No rear swaybars on the P38.  The JKS disconnects are adjustable in length and are approximately 3” longer at its shortest length than the stock links, which made it perfect for this purpose.  I had to enlarge the existing sway bar link mounting holes a little to fit the JKS disconnects.  I also had to purchase two shorter mounting bolts, one for each link, as the JKS’s came with a spacer and a longer bolt for one of the mounting holes.  Discard the spacer and bolt, and use the shorter bolt.

 

Brakelines:  The front brakelines were almost fully extended once everything was put back together and the axle dropped as low as it would go.  The shocks and JKS disconnects limited the downtravel.  In the rear, the brakelines were not a problem since I kept the stock length Bilstein shocks and they limited the downtravel.  Dap-inc.com offers a 2" longer P38 brake line kit.

  

LIFT RESULTS AND PERFORMANCE

 

According to Atlantic British, the height of a P38 in standard ride height with stock tires measured from the ground to the top of the wheel well is 31-3/4” in the front, and 32” in the rear.  With the OME 761 PS in front + 15 mm of trim packers and 781 PS in the rear, I measured 34-7/8” front and 35-3/4” in rear, with stock tires.  This equates to a lift of 3-1/8” in the front and 3-3/4” in the rear.  With BFG MT/KM 265/75/16 tires it measured 36-3/8” in the front and 37-1/4” in the rear.  Please note that the stock coil springs in these kits are much shorter than the OME’s and that is why I got so much lift.

 

On-Road Performance:  The OME springs ride great.  Firm but not harsh and handles bumps and turns very well.  Tracking at highway speeds is not as good as stock but definitely very very good for the amount of lift and the larger MT tires.  I have not experienced any driveline vibrations at this moment and just returned from a 1900 mile trip to Colorado and the lifted P38 on MT’s handled the winding mountain roads very well.  It also cruised pretty effortlessly on the highway.  Road handling would be even better with an AT tire.

 

Off-Road Performance:  I could not be happier.  Ran three days of varied terrain trails in Ouray and Gunnison area with excellent results.  On rocky trails, the P38 just walked up the rocks and obstacles, the articulation was excellent, and the axles rocked and rolled while the body stayed straight.  Front approach and rear departure angles are also greatly improved.  After a while, I would look for the most difficult line and the P38 just cruised through.  The combination of the OME lift, MT tires, and rear traction control (95-98), front and rear on (99-02), made for quick work on moderate to difficult trails. 

 

OTHER SPRING OPTIONS

 

In hindsight, I would have probably chosen a longer front spring so that I could get away from using trim packers.  An option is to put 761 Driver Side (DS) springs in instead of the 761 PS, this would give you a slightly taller spring and maybe use less trim packers.  764’s could also be an option and would give you about 0.4” over my 761 PS + 15mm trim packer combination.  I will probably go this route if I add a winch.  I also don’t see a problem using 751’s in the front or 762’s in the rear if one is inclined to do so, and it would probably yield a very similar amount of lift.

 

CONCLUSION

 

I could not be happier on how the lift turned out, but will be looking into some longer shocks in the future.  I am not a shock expert, so if anyone can provide more info that would be great.  The P38 having a longer wheelbase (108”) makes for much better rear passenger room and the cargo area is also very large.  With the coil spring lift, it drives great on the road, and it is also great off-road.  This in my opinion, makes the already good P38 an even better all round vehicle.  Hope this helps anyone interested, and hope to see more people modding the P38.

 

CURRENT SET-UP AND UPDATES

 

In anticipation of adding the bumper and winch I replaced my front OME 761 springs and trim packers, as shown previously, with OME 764 driver side springs. This gave me an additional 1.5" in the front with the stock bumper. I immediately got front driveshaft vibrations, which was cured with a double cardon driveshaft from Great Basin Rovers. After adding the bumper and winch, I now have 3.75 inches of lift in the front and back.

 

Replaced current BFG 265/75/16 MT/KM's with 255/85/16 (33.3" dia.) MT/KM's, no rubbing problems, but I did slightly trim the plastic sill behind the front tires due to clearance problems when the wheels are turned and articulated.

 

With the added weight of my rear bumper, swing-out, and spare tire, I added 10mm of trim packers and a Land Rover rubberized coil spring isolator under the rear OME 781 springs to bring the rear height back up.  Land Rover rubberized spring isolators are great to adjust lift height and can be used instead of OME trim packers.  I will probably in the future switch out the rear for a heavier duty OME spring and get rid of the trim packers and coil spring isolators, I'm thinking OME 763 extra heavy duty.

 

I have just received some information about longer shock options, Bilstein FJ80 shocks (Front B46-1477 and Rear B46-1478) are 2" longer than the stock Bilstein P38 shocks.  The rear FJ80 shocks are direct bolt in to the rear upper and lower P38 shock mounts.  The front FJ80 shocks require drilling a hole in the upper front P38 shock tower mount to install the shocks, lower mounts do not have to be modified.  Based on this information, OME shocks for the FJ80 would most likely also fit, but I do not know of anyone that has done it.

 

I recently installed front stock Bilstein Front Shocks B46-2214 into the rear shock location, exact same mounting points and they bolt right in.  This gives about a 2" longer shock length in the rear to match the front with the shock relocation bracket, this works perfect with my lift and gives a much better ride and articulation in the rear.  I did make a small bracket to slightly lengthen the brake line bracket so that I don't over-stretch the brake lines when fully articulated with the longer shocks.

 

Replaced rear OME 781 / trim packers / coil spring isolators combination with OME extra heavy duty 763 drivers side springs and 10mm trim packer.  This raised the rear end up about 1/2" over my previous rear set-up and the rear now sits 1" taller than the front, when loaded it sits perfectly level and alleviates the sagging rear end when loaded.  The ride is definitely harsher than the 781's, but not too bad and for me, tolerable along with a much better load carrying capacity as I carry allot of stuff on off-road trips.

 

Measurements with my current set-up and BFG 255/85/16 MT's are:

 

    Front from ground to top of wheel well:    38"

    Rear from ground to top of wheel well:    39"

 

DETROIT TRUETRAC DIFFERENTIALS

 

Tractech does not offer a direct bolt-in Truetrac limited slip differential for the P38.  In order to install them in a P38, you will have to get ring gear spacers and longer ring gear bolts.  These are the parts you will need:

 

Front:    Land Rover Truetrac #912A407 + Ring Spacer + Longer Ring Bolts

Rear:    Land Rover Truetrac #912A383 + Ring Spacer + Longer Ring Bolts

 

Bill Davis at Great Basin Rovers can supply you with the Truetrac differentials, ring spacers, and ring bolts.  He can also provide fully built and set-up 3rd members for ease in installation.  ARB does provide a direct drop in air actuated locker for  the P38 and Bill can also provide these.

 

I have decided to stick with the stock P38 axles for now with the Truetrac's.  I have heard mixed results with people running stock axles and Truetracs in Discovery I and II, but I hear that if you do break an axle with the Truetrac, you will most likely not destroy the Truetrac.  I'm a very cautious but aggressive driver and we'll see if this theory is true.

 

If you require a full locker in the rear, the Detriot Locker #187SL173A along with the spacer and ring bolts can also be installed in a P38.  But be aware, you will also want to upgrade the axles to heavy duty units as a full locker puts allot of stress on axles and the stock units will not last long.  If you break an axle with the Detroit locker, there is a very likely chance that the locker will be ruined, therefore installing heavy duty axles with a Detroit locker is highly recommended.  

 

Driving impressions on road is that the front Truetrac really helps in the high speed wander associated with the loss of castor due to lifting the suspension.  With my 3.5" of lift over standard EAS height, I was getting some high speed wander, wasn't too bad, but you knew it was there.  The front Truetrac differential really helps mask the loss of castor and the P38 now tracks very nicely.  There is slightly more effort in turning, as the Truetrac wants to return to center, but its not real noticeable and is actually a very nice added benefit.  Other than that, the front and rear Truetracs are indistinguishable from stock open differentials.

 

I have been very pleased with their off-road performance, I have noticed that my rear ETC kicks in allot less and traction is much better with the front Truetrac as my P38 does not have front ETC.  Steep, loose soil, and rocky accents were accomplished with much less wheel spin and drama.  I would highly recommend this upgrade to anyone.

 

Keep in mind that the Truetrac is a gear driven limited slip differential and not a full locking differential, but it should offer good on and off-road performance and compliment the ETC, even better if you have front and rear ETC.  For a nice write-up on how the Truetrac operates see this link http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/TrueTrac.shtml.  

 

DIFFERENTIAL GUARDS

 

I installed a Southdown rear differential guard, it was a little challenging to install but has taken some good hits with no problems.  I am currently finalizing a front differential guard design which bolts onto the existing front swaybar mount and existing round rubber vibration damper donut mount.  Testing and prototyping should be completed soon.

 

 

Click for larger image:

 

 

MY OTHER ROVER

 

1992 RANGE ROVER CLASSIC

 

Front:    OME 751

Rear:     OME 781

OME Shocks and Steering Stabilizer

1" Front and 2" Rear Spring Spacers

Super Swamper SSR 285/75/16 (33.9" Dia, 11.3" Width)

ARB Winch Bumper with Mile Marker E8000 Winch

Rovertym Sliders

Brownchurch Roof Rack

Front and Rear Diff Guards

2" Rovertym Body Lift 

Rovertym Stainless Steel Extended Brakelines

Rovertym Front and Rear Links

Rovertym HD Steering Rods and Stabilizer Relocation Kit

Rear Detroit Locker

Rovertracks Axles

Snorkel with ARB Snorkel Head

Rear Bumper with Swing-Out Spare Tire, Jerry Can, and Hi-Lift Mount Carrier

 

Click for larger image: